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on the environment. they hope to find ways to lower emissions worldwide. >> but there are deep divisions, and many expect there will not be any results from the talks, which and tomorrow. >> dw spoke earlier to the head of the u.n. environment program and we asked him if anything at all could come out of this conference. >> we still have to give you a days ago, and i believe there will be a number of outcomes. the green climate fund, the kyoto protocol extension -- these are fundamental building blocks of an international climate process, but ever since copenhagen, we are pursuing a search for a new framework for global climate cooperation, and doha in itself will not deliver that. we should also recognize that these conferences have not provided us with a single framework, but they have triggered all across the world immense initiatives in the direction of a low-carbon economy, and i think these are also a byproduct of this process, and we need to recognize them because they are part of building our ability to move towards a low-carbon future. nevertheless, doha should at a minimum enable us to k
than expected. >> every month we waste makes protecting the environment more expensive and increases the problems for the people whose lives have already been adversely affected. we have no time to lose. >> even germany, considered a leader on environmental protection, has come under criticism. the mayan minister could not live up to his promise. environmental groups say it is largely down to chancellor angela merkel. >> merkel has not use her voice strongly enough, and that is why the situation in the eu is so critical. it is lacking a leader, and effects are being felt everywhere. >> climate experts warn that if emissions do not sink in the coming years, the consequences will be dire. a new climate treaty is due before 2020, but after events in doha, that is looking more unlikely than ever. >> as we saw in that report, the german environment minister is playing a key role in the climate talks. we asked if he thought there would be a breakthrough. >> first of all, we are in the middle of a very, very important and difficult negotiation process. i expect negotiations going on all day
to tackle climate change. environment ministers from around the world are rolling up their sleeves in doha, qatar, to address the challenges they share. they have rising greenhouse gas emissions, ice sheets melting rapidly and a warming planet. ban ki-moon urged them to speeds up negotiations on climate change. >> delegates are deadlocked over finances, developing nations are calling on trializ liindustrial countries to stop global warning. a delegate from the pacific island nation of palau says financial support to protect the lives of people there is indispensable. >> we don't have the resources, and we are also being threatened by climate change. financing is part of our survival. we need finances to survive. >> the delegates are running up against a deadline, the conference scheduled to end on friday. now, the ministers come to the table with competing interests. they come from nations with a range of environmental and economic challenges. nhk world has morerom doha. >> the meeting taking place this year in the oil rich qatar has entered the final stretch. delegates are making the fina
, signs that drove him to do more to help the environment. >> giving the blessings to the people and healing that is not enough. i have to do more. the whole world is suffering from this climate crisis. >> he always carries holy water with him. he says it has stress-relieving properties, and that could be needed here. negotiators have come from all over the world. u.n. secretary general ban ki- moon is also here to push the talks forward. delegates were shown a bleak video portraying the terrible effects of climate change. few expect any breakthroughs here. instead, environmental groups put on a sarcastic performance, handing an award to the biggest contributors per-capita to climate change, new zealand, canada, and the u.s. 1 lebanese activist is one of the demonstrators. in his home country, climate protection is a side issue. conflict in the middle east and the civil war in syria take up the headlines. he wants to change that. >> if we take down a dictatorship to establish a democracy and i do not have a plan to live on, what shall i do with democracy? -- have a planet to live
that await us in the future. >> japan's environment minister nagahama did not address concerns japan will miss its midterm goal of cutting emissions by 25% by 2020. but he promised to continue financial support for developing nations. >> translator: japan will contribute to fight climate change through cooperation with all the countries, including developing nations. >> delegates from industrialized nations say emerging economies should bear an equal burden. they say greenhouse gas emissions are rising rapidly in countries such as china and india. but the senior chinese delegate said industrialized countries should look at their own record. >> tralator: we can't change the fact that industrialized nations have long beenhe main emitter of greenhouse gases and the cause of climate change. >> ministers have only two days to wrap up their discussions. >>> the evacuees of namee town have been away from home for 21 months and it could be years before they return. they were among the people who had to evacuate after the nuclear disaster in fukushima and many are feeling stressed out after t
or medicare diand id and social security or the environment, global climate change, it all comes back to how we receive information. and that this issue you're addressing in this letter is at the heart of your -- >> bill, many of the viewers there are concerned about the growing gap, unequal distribution of wealth and income. they're concerned about health care, concerned about global warming, concerned about women's rights, health, and many, many other issues. if you are concerned about those issues, you must be concerned about media and the increased concentration of ownership in the media. because unless we get ordinary people involved in that discussion. unless we make media relevant to the lives of ordinary people and not use it as a distraction, we are not going to resolve many of these serious crisis, global warming being one. there are scientists who will come on your show and say, "hey, forget everything else. if we don't get a handle on global warming, there's not going to be much less of this planet in a hundred years." do you see that often being portrayed in the corporate media?
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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